Tag Archives: GRHE Sakasa Kebari

Tying with hunted materials this year

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Four dozen GRHE Sakara Kebari

 

Our fall season came to an abrupt halt in the PNW this year as our year long drought was quickly replaced by flooding and far too much water.  What is a fisherman to do?  I’ve done a bit of steelhead fishing on lower water days but they seem to last about one day before the next flood hits so mostly I’ve been tying for next season.

Lots of kebari materials here

Lots of kebari materials here

This year I’m again sticking to my GRHE Sakasa Kebari but with a twist – I’m only using feathers from birds I have personally shot.   Luckily in Western Washington Pheasant Release areas one is able to kill hen pheasants as well as roosters.  The hen is my material of choice for this kebari.  I managed  4 hens this season along with about  a 16 roosters from Eastern Washington hunts so I have plenty of tying material as well as dinners.   There will be more hunting over the mountains before that season ends.   Now I need to find some rabbits so I can cover the body of the fly too.

 

My One Fly season

A box full of my one fly.

A box full of my one fly.

This season I decided to go the One Fly route and see what I could  learn from it.   I decided to stick with me GRHE Sakasa Kebari as my only fly for the year and tied them in #12-#16 in both standard and beaded versions.    A month in was my last update and I was pretty happy with the decision at that time.    Now after 3 plus months with 78 river days I have to say I am very happy with my decision to stick with one pattern all year.   I don’t think the season is quite over but getting pretty close as the rivers are set to rise next week due to the rains that will hit here in the PNW.

 

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Tenkara on the Yak

Yakima in Ellensburg

Yakima in Ellensburg

The Yakima River is the premiere blue-ribbon trout river in Washington State and has been one of my favorite places to fish for the last 20 years.   This season I focused so much on the small Cascade and foothill rivers on the west side that I never did the drive over Snoqualmie Pass to fish the Yakima except very early in the season when I was over for a snowshoe race.   The Yakima is a big river,  you can rarely wade across it and it is primarily fished from drift boats.  In the fall the water levels drop and wading is at least not a life threatening experience.  After a season using nothing but tenkara for trout though I just had to see how fishing a big river with tenkara would be so I packed my Amago and Yamame, headed over I-90 and pulled into Ellensburg at 10 a.m. under sunny skies and temps finally climbing into the 40s.   After a quick stop at Worley Bugger Fly Co. I decided to start right in town at Rinehart Park where the water is a bit smaller and less crowded than the fabled canyon waters below town.

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Tying the GRHE Sakasa Kebari

The first in a series of fly tying videos showing how to tie the GRHE Sakasa Kebari.  This is my favorite fly and I usually start the day with it unless fish are actively rising.   It is  a simple reverse hackle fly that only uses a few materials.

Hook:   Umpqua C300BL  #12-14
Threat: Tan 6/0
Hackle: Pheasant Rump
Body:   Hare's Ear dubbing
Rib:    Fine Gold Oval Tinsel

Here are the video instructions on tying the kebari:

One Kebari, Two Kebari, Three Kebari (more?)

When I first learned about tenkara at the Fly Fishing Show I was intrigued by Daniel explaining the one-fly philosophy.   Coming from western fly fishing where my box is full of patterns to match the hatch it just seemed improbable that one fly could be used in most situations and catch fish.   I started tying some kebari for fishing and, like with western fly fishing, tied a few flies in about a dozen different patterns to start with.   As I read more though about tenkara philosophy and thought about it I realized that I had caught most of my small stream fish on a few patterns and decided to adapt these patterns to tenkara.   I scrapped the dozen or so different kebari I had tied originally and settled into two basic patterns which I have used 95% of the time with success.   For a few weeks I thought I might be able to get down to one of these then hit a situation where I absolutely needed a small fly to catch fish so instead of going from two to one pattern I now carry three patterns of kebari with me but have not felt the need for any more.   Right now I can live with three patterns and I have found these to be effective in every creek, river and lake that I have fished over this season.

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