Monthly Archives: October 2013

The Ju and the Go

The Go (left) and Ju (right)

The Go (left) and Ju (right)

A few weeks ago I read a blog post on Discover Tenkara which had a video of Dr. Ishigaki showing entitled “Soft Ju and hard Go for tenkara“.   I found this technique interesting, switching the grip between a standard forefinger on top, the hard gō, and a light thumb and last two finger grip for the soft jū.   Before reading this I always kept the forefinger gō grip when casting and when drifting or adding action to the kebari.   Switching to the softer jū grip after the cast is simple and does indeed give a softer feel to the lifts and drops of the rod when actively working the kebari in the current.

A few days ago I was on the river and there were some sporadic October Caddis coming off the water.   I had on a fairly large GRHE Sakasa Kebari in #12 and used the jū grip while activating the kebari as it swung across the current.   Big trout (well, big for this river) couldn’t resist.  I had several fish hit the kebari 3-4x before finally hooking up, they were just drawn to the fly and the way it was behaving just like the emerging caddis.   This is definitely a technique I will start next season with.

Bonus Days

Nice mid-October cutthroat

Nice mid-October cutthroat

Even though you can fish 365 days a year in Washington for trout, for the most part the season in the small Cascade and foothill rivers comes to a close somewhere near the end of September when the rains begin and the rivers fill.    This year I though the season was over at the end of September too, rivers were 10x their summer flows and the cold, wet weather seemed to be here to stay.    Yes, I’ve managed to get over and fish the Yakima a few times in the last few weeks but that doesn’t count, it is on the dry side of the Cascades.

Continue reading

Tenkara on the Yak

Yakima in Ellensburg

Yakima in Ellensburg

The Yakima River is the premiere blue-ribbon trout river in Washington State and has been one of my favorite places to fish for the last 20 years.   This season I focused so much on the small Cascade and foothill rivers on the west side that I never did the drive over Snoqualmie Pass to fish the Yakima except very early in the season when I was over for a snowshoe race.   The Yakima is a big river,  you can rarely wade across it and it is primarily fished from drift boats.  In the fall the water levels drop and wading is at least not a life threatening experience.  After a season using nothing but tenkara for trout though I just had to see how fishing a big river with tenkara would be so I packed my Amago and Yamame, headed over I-90 and pulled into Ellensburg at 10 a.m. under sunny skies and temps finally climbing into the 40s.   After a quick stop at Worley Bugger Fly Co. I decided to start right in town at Rinehart Park where the water is a bit smaller and less crowded than the fabled canyon waters below town.

Continue reading